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dc.contributor.authorRunnels, Rufus Stanley
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-20T14:56:25Z
dc.date.available2014-01-20T14:56:25Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11005/2159
dc.description.abstractA review of the historic work of the Lambeth Conference and the General Convention of the Episcopal Church clearly demonstrates that in the late 19th and early 20th centuries interfaith interaction was evangelistically driven. While the motivation might have been equal parts colonialism and non-religious fervor, conversion was the goal of interfaith interaction during this period. As non-Western, non-Christian people began to appear more and more in England following World War II and the US following 1965, the foreign missionary paradigm along with its evangelize-and-convert methodology became less useful.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDr. Benjamin King and Dr. Robert Hughes, III, School of Theologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectNon-Christian traditionsen_US
dc.subjectEvangelismen_US
dc.subjectConversionen_US
dc.subjectLambeth Conferenceen_US
dc.subjectInterfaith interactionen_US
dc.subjectInterfaith dialogueen_US
dc.subjectAnglican Communionen_US
dc.subjectUniversity of the Southen_US
dc.subjectSchool of Theology thesis 2012en_US
dc.subjectSchool of Theology, University of the South, Sewanee, Tennesseeen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Convention of the Episcopal Churchen_US
dc.titleA Survey of the Work of the General Convention and the Lambeth Conference Considering a Theology for Interfaith Dialogueen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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