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dc.contributor.authorde Wetter, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorDr. Sherry Hamby
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-14T18:33:12Z
dc.date.available2021-05-14T18:33:12Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.sewanee.edu/handle/11005/21775
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine how adolescents recovered positive emotional affect during or after challenging experiences. Methods: 50 youth (ages 12 to 20) from rural communities in southern Appalachia participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews, where they discussed key moments of their lives. Grounded theory analysis was used to code the interview transcripts. Results: Six areas of recovering positive affect were identified, including relational, cognitive, faith, nature, downtime/indirect, and behavioral approaches. Relational approaches were mentioned the most (27 interviews), followed by cognitive (26), religion/spirituality-based (20), behavioral (12), indirect (6), and nature (3). Conclusions: Youth used a variety of strategies to not just minimize distress but also re-attain positive emotions. This is an understudied aspect of resilience.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was made possible through the support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation. The opinions expressed in this project are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the John Templeton Foundation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of the Southen_US
dc.subjectScholarship Sewanee 2021en_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectPositive Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectResilienceen_US
dc.title“Keep Positive Things In Your Life, And You Know You’ll Be Alright”: Adolescents Recovering Positive Affecten_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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