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dc.contributor.authorPichardo, Bianca
dc.contributor.authorKebede, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorHuerta, Edgar
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-14T18:36:56Z
dc.date.available2021-05-14T18:36:56Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.sewanee.edu/handle/11005/21776
dc.description.abstractThe United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world and disproportionately imprisons minorities, particularly African-Americans. Research shows that incarceration has many impacts on the individuals and families affected. One important question is whether high rates of incarceration silence the voices of minority communities by discouraging voting, affecting the structure of the political system. We use county-level data from 2010-2018 to study the impact of incarceration on the voter turnout rate in the 2012 and 2016 presidential elections. We find that incarceration has an insignificant effect on voter turnout after controlling for other demographic variables. However, the impacts of incarceration may operate through other channels, impacting demographic characteristics such as income and education. Thus, further research is needed to determine the effects of mass incarceration on voter engagement.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of the Southen_US
dc.subjectScholarship Sewanee 2021en_US
dc.subjectMass Incarcerationen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Participationen_US
dc.titleIncarceration Effects on Voter Turnouten_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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