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dc.contributor.authorRutten, Hallie
dc.contributor.authorScott, Monae
dc.contributor.authorCline, Shelby
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-03T13:44:19Z
dc.date.available2022-08-03T13:44:19Z
dc.date.issued2022-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.sewanee.edu/handle/11005/21882
dc.description.abstractBats are a vital part of ecosystems serving as pollinators, pest control, and seed dispersers for important crops. Some bat populations have been declining due to one of the worst wildlife diseases in modern history, Pseudogymnoascus destructans - more commonly known as white-nose syndrome. Dr. Amy Turner and the Sewanee Bat Study group have collected years of data on the behavior and habitats of local bat species. The goals of this project include: analyzing the trends in frequencies in bat activity across time and management areas to see which locations are crucial for bats, what land management practices are harmful or helpful, and what species seem to be thriving or not.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAmy Turner, Kevin Fouts, Eric Keenen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of the Southen_US
dc.subjectUniversity of the South, Sewanee, Tennesseeen_US
dc.subjectSewanee DataLab 2022en_US
dc.subjectDataFest 2022en_US
dc.subjectProtecting the Bat Populationen_US
dc.subjectCombating Ecological Challengesen_US
dc.subjectEcosystemsen_US
dc.subjectForest Managementen_US
dc.subjectWildlifeen_US
dc.subjectLand Management Strategiesen_US
dc.titleProtecting the Bat Populationen_US
dc.title.alternativeComBATing Ecological Challengesen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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